Research

Research Blog Post Research allows us to access different viewpoints and better understand a subject. Thus, helping separate from fiction, and helps one obtain knowledge in any area. Research helps us gain knowledge and separate fact from fiction. As well as to test, and create theories in order that we are better able to inform about social action and potentially improve social conditions.

In the Classroom

Research is the gathering of data, information and facts for the advancement of knowledge. Descriptive research is survey, historical content analysis, associational is correlational and casual comparative, and intervention is experimental and action research. It encourages people to explore possibilities, to understand existing issues, and to disclose the truth and fabricated ones. Reading, writing, observing, analyzing, and interacting with other facilitate an inquisitive mind’s quest for knowledge and efficient learning.

Potential Jobs

Statistician
A statistician job is to gather quantitative data as well as the research, and the interpretation of such data while working on theoretical statistics. A statistician main job is collecting data for use in surveys, experiments, and constructing graphs.

Historian
Historians seek to reveal information about the past, and verify their findings through research. This is in the form of studying historical records in archives, conducting interviews, and several other methods used in revealing the truth about history.

Law Enforcement
Law enforcement uses research to help protect and serve such as conducting witness interviews, analyzing statements and evidence to solve crime both violent and nonviolent. Policing could be achieved using the foundation of research and analysis.

How Are These Jobs Relevant?

As a statistician, a person can work in a variety of settings. The focus will be conducting research, collect and analyze data, and communicating with a team on discoveries. Being a historian, a must has a strong research skill. Discovering past information and questioning its credibility is one of the key duties of a historian. Research is a big component of being a police officer. Without the proper research, a police officer will not be able to properly charge an individual for a crime, find addresses to certain areas in his or her precinct, and identify individuals.

Usefulness in Other Settings

Research is an essential part of our professional and academic lives. Great research better prepares individuals to take on tasks head on. The answer to conducting great research is to be iterative. Research overall helps us become better writers, communicators, and professionals.

Xavier Wells

What Can You Do With Your English Degree?

I frequently have to defend my major to people. Being an English major has a bad reputation and most people only see one road from an English degree to potential jobs. Watch this video to prepare yourself with defenses to common misconceptions about the English major, while you learn the myriad of new directions that your English major can take you!

Lauren Ryder

The Cost of Graduate School

The rising cost of college tuition is a concern for students as more students take out student loans and personal debt. College graduates contemplating going to graduate school outside of their legal state of residence will be surprised at the out-of-state tuition costs. At the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, its 2017 tuition and fees for graduate school are $23,178 for out-of-state students.

Here is a comparison chart of graduate out-of-state tuition fees for several colleges in Louisiana:

Source: https://www.collegetuitioncompare.com/state/?state=LA

Kenneth Anderson

Joan Stear

Professor Joan Stear is from New Iberia, Louisiana. She attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette in 1978 and received her Bachelor’s of Liberal Arts in English in 1982. A year later she obtained her Master’s degree. Professor Stear began college as a philosophy major but found herself drawn to English.

Current Position

Professor Joan Stear is an Instructor of English here at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her daily schedule includes class instruction, a great deal of grading, (sometimes stacks of essays and tests as tall as she is) advising English majors, and tending to her students’ writing. Though she never expected she’d be a college professor but feels that teaching was her vocation and aims to offer more guidance for writing students.

Preparation

Professor Stear applies her English degree to her work every day and believes “good writers model good writing for future teachers.” She says “If you want to teach well, learn to adapt and know your subject. By nature, teaching is spontaneous. It isn’t narrowed to a manual.”

Skills

Some of Professor Stear’s first instructor positions included teaching literature and composition to gifted high school students; teaching English as-a-second-language to Asian students in Japan; and teaching elders life-writing in a course she designed. She uses grammar (which she thinks of as “architecture of a sentence and thought’); vocabulary; and rhetoric, along with a number of other language skills. Professor Stear believes the best assets to have as a teacher are interpersonal skills. She includes in her writing course syllabus-scheduled conference days devoted to meeting one-on-one with each of her students to discuss their writing, meeting together as “reader and writer (with a bit of teacherly advice).”

Accomplishments

Professor Stear considers her personal crowning achievement the creation of her senior life-writing class (founded in 1990 at the Lafayette General Medical Center). Students of her parents’ and grandparents’ generations wrote memoirs, held public readings, published and recorded their stories. This class lead to more than a decade of workshops and grant projects, including several intergenerational projects, one of which was even brought over seas with a colleague to a teachers’ conference. Although Stear no longer teaches elders, she has maintained friendships with her former students (some are in their nineties and centennial years) and recognizes her privilege of having taught multiple generations of students.

Kelsey Speyrer

Careers in English

Think that getting a masters in English isn’t a good idea? Think again! Furthering your education could lead you to your dream job. From becoming an English professor or to becoming a lawyer, there is a variety of options to choose from to have a fulfilling future!

 

Taylor Deshotel

Salaries for Prospective English Majors

English majors are typically ridiculed for not being able to find jobs that pay above minimum wage. However, this is simply not the case. This graph highlights seven different jobs that are high paying and four times more likely to hire an English major over any others. I think this would be a helpful image for many prospective English students, because finding a good job is a determining factor when choosing a major for many students. Each of these jobs is highly respectable and well paying, which would dispel the myth of English majors either being teachers or unemployed.

Source: goo.gl/UKuizR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dylan Moore

MBA

An undergraduate degree in English is one of the most versatile degrees one can have. The skills learned as an English major, such as critical thinking and effective communication, are relevant for most postgraduate degree programs. Choosing to pursue a graduate degree will help English majors stand out in a competitive job market.

Degree

An MBA may not be the first choice for most English undergraduates. However, for those who plan to take on management positions, start up their own company, or even become a novelist, an MBA may be the right post-graduate degree plan to pursue. An English major’s ability to analyze large combinations of data and articulate ideas will prove to be useful in an MBA program. English majors also excel at coming up with innovative ideas, which is one of the most important components to business success.

Preparation

Those who pursue an MBA will need to take the GMAT, which divides into four sections: mathematics, reading comprehension and critical thinking, integrated reasoning, and an essay. Students who majored in English as undergraduates have already developed the skills needed to complete a majority of the test. For instance, since English majors have more experience writing, their essay will be stronger than most. This gives those who studied English as an undergrad a clear advantage when dealing with the majority of the GMAT.

Careers

Students who graduate with an MBA can take their degree and work in many different fields, ranging from healthcare to government. Some of the most sought-after jobs for MBA graduates are managers (i.e. health services manager, financial manager, sales manager, etc) and management consultants. Though, an MBA can be useful outside of managerial roles. A novelist, for instance, who self-publishes needs to know how to sell their books.

Did You Know?

At Stanford Graduate School of Business, only 14 percent of admits had Business degrees. Meanwhile, 48 percent of admits had undergraduate degrees in Humanities or Social Sciences. This is because English majors do better on the GMAT than business or economic majors. So, while a business undergraduate degree is valuable when applying for an MBA, English majors can still hold their own.

Jasmine Broussard

Editing

An important skill for writers to master is editing. The process of publication—planning, research, writing, proofreading, formatting, and finally, publishing—is defined by the editing process. Editing consists of research, proofreading, and formatting together, as editors must ensure the final document is accurate, free of grammar and verbiage errors, and visually appealing to the reader. As a professional editor, workplace duties may include anything from editing the final document to a bigger picture responsibility of selecting content for a comprehensive project.

In the Classroom

As soon as an individual begins writing at an academic level, they also begin to edit. Both peer review activities and rough draft editing done by professors help to achieve this. For example, in Technical Writing classes, students must bring their documents to class so that others may check their wording, formatting, and overall schematic of the document.

Potential Jobs

Editor in Chief

Editors in chief manage all other editors of a company and ensure that all documents produced are true to the nature and beliefs of the company. They are found in many industries, but predominately publishing.

Acquisitions Editor

Acquisitions editors recruit new talent by reading manuscripts and deciding if they are worthy of further interest from the company. They are usually found in research and development industries.

Copy Editor

Copy Editors are responsible for locating grammar and formatting errors that compromise the appeal of the document’s appearance and integrity. Many work on a freelance basis, but others thrive in the world of marketing.

How Are These Jobs Relevant?

Editors must be able to look closely at text and analyze it. Editors in chief do this on a large scale by overseeing publication. They examine all content and eliminate unworthy material. Acquisitions exhibit this attention to detail in a similar way. They comb through manuscripts and decide what is sent to be further edited and developed. Copy editors show their keen eye in the most meticulous way. They locate the most inconspicuous errors such as grammar mistakes, formatting issues, and word choice.

Usefulness in Other Settings

Editing is useful in the day to day life because it trains a person to be careful in their actions. If trained to look closely for errors in the workplace, individuals are less likely to misread directions or incorrectly follow a recipe. Editing is the foundation of literature and media, and should be important to students and employees alike.

Shelby Youtsas

Janmel Moore

Janmel Moore is a Mass Communication major with a minor in English, from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette from the spring semester of 1999 to the spring semester of 2006. As a student at UL she completed an internship with KLFY. Janmel advised graduating with a minor in English allowed her to delve deep into the subject matter, and increase her potential in news casting.

Janmel Moore

Current Position

Janmel’s current position is a logistics supervisor for Target’s supply chain and she owns her own daycare/tutoring center. She manages 14-18 individuals, communicating directions on what needs to be done within a certain time frame based on a specific workload. As a manager she provides feedback and share findings with other leaders daily to ensure they are all aware of what is going in effort to support a healthy operation cycle.

Preparation

Understanding how to interpret, and relay a thought or feeling is how English plays a role in her life. Having a minor in English prepared Janmel to be able to read through and verbally be taught information given to learn that explained the basis of her position. Using proper terminology in the workplace, being able to structure a document when need is credited to my minor in English.

Skills

Janmel states that, “Documentation and effective communication between peers are ways I use my minor in English degree in my current position.” She believes, “We all learn the same things about proper English to communicate, but it is what we choose do with that knowledge is what produces superiority in the English field.” Janmel advises, “Students graduate with degrees, but do not have the passion to teach.”

Accomplishments

Janmel advises having the ability to create your own documents for my personal business, and writing your own proposals for the business as some major accomplishments. Being a successful tutor for young adults and children at her daycare is a big accomplishment for her love of the English art. As she cites its not about the money, but investing in this generation’s future.

Xavier Wells

Anna Campbell

Originally from Colfax, Louisiana, Anna Campbell attended UL from Fall 2012 to Spring 2017. She graduated with a degree in English, with a concentration in Professional Writing. She began her undergrad at UL as a Performing Arts major with a concentration in dance, but considering her future after graduation, she chose to major in English.

Anna Campbell

Current Position

Anna Campbell is currently juggling several positions. She teaches Ballet at Dance Dynamics, does freelance writing for Community Chronicles, and also works in retail. Her daily schedule includes creating a fun and challenging curriculum for her dance students, making phone calls, sending several emails, and conducting research for her articles.

Preparation

Studying English has taught Anna how to communicate with different types of people. In addition to learning how to write well, she has learned skills that are essential to her career. Blogging, document design, and editing are also applicable to social media management or marketing. As part of her post-undergrad life, communication gives her a upper hand at convincing others that she has the ability to do a job.

Skills

Anna uses her editing skills to review internal and external documents for her dance studio. By far, Anna believes that communication is the most valuable skill she learned as an English major. Clear communication skills has greatly assisted her in being professional in the beginning of her career.

Accomplishments

After gaining a degree in English, Campbell was accepted to the Master’s Certificate in Publishing program at the Denver Publishing Institute (DPI). The program focuses of all aspects of publishing such as: acquisitions, editing, marketing, sales, social media, publication, graphic design. As DPI is well known in the publishing world, having the certification under her belt gives Campbell access to potential opportunities in the future.

Wilhelmina Beauchamp